The Road Out of Damascus

Lilly, Rafael, and a million other Middle Eastern refugees journeyed and continue to journey to the shores of Europe. Now, Nazarene churches across the region are creating practical, holistic, and compassionate responses to the increasing needs of immigration—and integration. These churches aim to become a bridge of practical grace to both the receiving culture and those seeking refuge. 

Read More
Do Not Be Afraid: The Church in a Time of Mass Shootings

For Christians, we take time to discern what God longs to do in such brokenness. If the gospel is good news, then it must be good news for real-world challenges. We understand that our life together, as the body of Christ in this world, acts as a witness of love to the politics of the state. But in many cases, our witness of love becomes muddled by stories that are not true, and we may find ourselves driven more by fear and the pursuit of security than by faithfully living the promise of resurrection.

Read More
Family, Not Refugees

In 2016, the Church of the Nazarene in Armenia started “Hand in Hand,” a ministry supporting Syrian families who fled their country in search of safety. The project includes two VBS programs, and more than 25 families have received further aid through a warm winter project, medication, medical aid, rent support, academic support, skills development, and help with daily urgent needs.

Read More
Across the Table: Ministry to Refugees

Each year, the Grand Rapids International Fellowship (GRIF) Church of the Nazarene in Grand Rapids, Michigan hosts an international potluck. This year, the church’s gym was filled to capacity with people from all over the world sharing singing, dancing, and food. The tables were crammed with both church members and refugees, those who have found this taste of heaven through one ministry: Community Link.  

Read More
Active Compassion

William had left Venezuela with his wife and daughter, who was pregnant at the time, and they knew their money was not going to last. By selling some of their items, they had had just enough for the multi-day bus fare and food for the journey. They knew they would have a difficult time when they arrived, but even that seemed like a better option than staying; their daughter needed antibiotics, and there weren’t any available. Through the Church of the Nazarene, the family was able to stay in a small shelter. 

Read More